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Eagles Nest Outfitters’ Kanga™ Backpack Eagles Nest Outfitters’ (ENO) newest lifestyle bag, the Kanga takes hammock storage to the next level. Asheville, N.C., February 12, 2014 — Eagles Nest Outfitters (ENO), the leading provider of packable, camping hammocks, debuts their first lifestyle day pack: the Kanga. Larger than ENO’s other hammock storage solution, the Possum Pocket, the sleek construction, two-fold purpose and bright color palette of the Kanga is designed for more than just the great outdoors.   Joining a variety of other bags and cases, the Kanga is developed to serve the need of a multi-functional bag perfect for day-to-day activities as well as outdoor adventures. Where the Possum Pocket allows just enough space for a hammock and suspension system, the Kanga highlights a larger and more flexible design, with two exterior pockets, two interior pockets, and a zippered wallet stash. “Our customers are looking for more from us,” said Peter Pinholster, ENO’s co-owner and president. “The Kanga is a way for us to be part of their everyday life, while still complimenting our hammock lines.” Created from 200D Ripstop Nylon with a DWR and PU finish, the Kanga is durable for the active lifestyle of ENO’s market. Plus, fashioned with comfort in mind, the adjustable, padded shoulder...
***NOTE FROM ENO:  This is part 3 of a 5-part series about how to stay active in the outdoors through flatland training – essentially, training for the mountains without actually being in the mountains.***   When you’re in the mountains, you’re typically going to have something on your back. Whether it’s a boulder pad, a pack full of gear, or your kid, something’s going to be adding weight to your back. So my third suggestion for flatland training would be to start training with some weight on your back. You could buy a lead vest, but that disperses the weight evenly across your upper body. You won’t get the full effect of having to stand upright while having something on your back. It’s the perfect time for you to get your pack on your back and get re-accustomed to what it feels like. I’d suggest using the same backpack you’ll be using when you’re training. I’d also suggest walking with you pack on, and to try and walk instead of run. When you walk, you’ll also be minimizing the impact on your joints and be able to prevent injuries as well. When I was younger and playing organized sports, my...

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