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Alright ENOpians we are about a week away from the Spring Equinox! Whoooo! That means that our weekends will soon be filled with hammocking, camping, playing in rivers and then when we’re all done…we’ll be hungry. Cooking–or eating rather–is personally one of my times of camping trips. You just can’t get that campfire taste at home. There is an art to cooking out in the middle of nowhere however. Read on to explore these tips on how to become a backcountry chef!   1. Can it! Depending on what kind of camping you’re doing, try to minimize the amount of space your kitchen-on-the-go takes up. For example, if you’re doing car camping, opt for canned goods instead of taking up up valuable real estate in your cooler.   2. Chop at Home Try to minimize the amount of work you have to do on site by preparing as much as possible at home. Does your recipe call for onion? Then before you head into the woods, chop the necessary amount at home. So peel, mince, dice and pack it up!   3. Simplify Your Tools If you think you’re a star in the kitchen, you probably have an affinity for...
The Talon Ridgeline (Talon for short) is not only extremely cute, it’s just plain useful! With the Talon, your rain fly is always perfectly centered and your personal items and gear are always within reach.
Space is of the essence when you’ve got nothing but your backpack to take on your world travels. Your clothes, food and other essentials already demand the lion’s share of space, so travel gadgets need to be the perfect trifecta: Have a small form factor, lightweight and useful enough to take the place of something else in your bag.   ENO DoubleNest Hammock Weighing less than two pounds, the DoubleNest hammock makes the ultimate travel companion. It’s just enough room to comfortably fit up to two sleepy travelers. You can use your hammock for a quick rest or a full night of sleep. You don’t exactly pitch your entire tent setup to take a nap. Recharging your body is essential to any journey, especially if you’re in foreign territory.  Plus, if your backpack’s stuffed to the brim you can always attach the hammock and straps to the outside of your pack.   The North Face Your backpacking journey starts, appropriately enough, with selecting the correct backpack. You have a range of options out there, but when you’re carting around high-tech tools, you need a high-tech bag to handle it. The North Face’s Surge 2 backpack is a lightweight bag with a...
Even though the days are getting longer, the nights are dark and lacking fun LEDs. Light up your evening with our re-designed Twilights!
  The so-called “ten essentials” are a constantly debated and altered list within the backpacking community. Understanding what comprises the ten essentials and, most importantly, bringing them on every trip is a simple and easy way to ensure that you have a great time in the backcountry. 1. Navigation Bring maps, a compass and, if needed, a GPS. Most importantly, know how to use these tools. Look around for a local backpacking or cartography club and take a topography class. Just understanding a topographical map and being able to read it is essential to staying safe in the backcountry. If you’re traveling into an area with poorly marked trails, bring a GPS. Getting lost in the woods is the worst, and it’s always nice to know where you are and how to get back if needed. Before you leave make sure to mark water sources and possible campsites on the map so that you can better plan your day. 2. Sun Protection Ensuring that you stay healthy while backpacking is also very essential to having a good time and being able to continue comfortably. Sunscreen is great, but what’s better are clothes that are UV treated. Wear clothes that can protect...
Going backpacking is not at all about the destination; it’s about the journey. Understanding how to make that journey about your surroundings and not about the aching and discomfort is essential to any backpacking trip, so here are some tips: Partner/Friends: Find a group of friends that you are close with and that are willing to get dirty. Traveling through the countryside is also an excellent way to get closer with people so don’t be afraid to go with people that you don’t know that well. The most important part of finding a group is ensuring that everyone is well prepared and willing to allot the time to travel. If it’s your first time, find some friends that are experienced. The experience will go a long way and will help everyone to have a more enjoyable trip in general. Destination If it’s your first time, pick a place that is well mapped, has plenty of water, and is not too hilly. Make sure that it’s not too far away and be sure to have a plan if anything becomes too burdensome. Pick a place with plenty of overlooks, waterfalls, and sights to see. It will make the trip much more...
  Whether you’re going on a weekend trip or backpacking down the AT for a month, these tips will help make life a little easier out on the trail!   1. Practice Setting Up and Breaking Down Camp Take everything out to the backyard and do a test run on all your gear before you leave. This will not only re-familiarize you with everything; it will allow you to inspect your gear for dead batteries, rips in your sleeping bag, and dull knife blades and make sure everything is working properly. Pitch your tent or hang up your hammock and tarp. Unroll your sleeping pad and sleeping bag, try out your headlamp batteries, light your stove, and set up other gear where you would like it to be at your site. Then pack everything up. Doing this once when it’s light and then again when it’s dark will prepare you for set up/break down at any time, day or night.   2. Do Some Research Study up on the area that you’re going to. Learn the climate, elevation, types of wildlife, and where the water is. Familiarize yourself with the trail markers and make sure that you find out whether...

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