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***NOTE FROM ENO:  This is part 4 of a 5-part series about how to stay active in the outdoors through flatland training – essentially, training for the mountains without actually being in the mountains.***   Well folks, we’re on the downhill stretch of this 5-part series. Speaking of downhill, that reminds me of how great a workout riding a bike gives you. That’s why part 4 is to ride a bike. I’m not talking about a motorcycle, I’m referring to a human-powered bicycle. There’s a variety of different bikes you can use to train. The two I’ll focus on the most is the road bike and mountain bike. Personally, I prefer a mountain bike, but you’re not alone if you want to get into training on a road bike. There’s a huge road bike community in the area where I live, and on weekend mornings it’s easy to find the pack of 50+ people riding around town. Road bike’s are great if you’re looking to ride the distance. These things have multiple gears and thinner tires which are meant to give you the speed to cover long distances. You can easily get locked into a steady rhythm and work on...
***NOTE FROM ENO:  This is part 3 of a 5-part series about how to stay active in the outdoors through flatland training – essentially, training for the mountains without actually being in the mountains.***   When you’re in the mountains, you’re typically going to have something on your back. Whether it’s a boulder pad, a pack full of gear, or your kid, something’s going to be adding weight to your back. So my third suggestion for flatland training would be to start training with some weight on your back. You could buy a lead vest, but that disperses the weight evenly across your upper body. You won’t get the full effect of having to stand upright while having something on your back. It’s the perfect time for you to get your pack on your back and get re-accustomed to what it feels like. I’d suggest using the same backpack you’ll be using when you’re training. I’d also suggest walking with you pack on, and to try and walk instead of run. When you walk, you’ll also be minimizing the impact on your joints and be able to prevent injuries as well. When I was younger and playing organized sports, my...
***NOTE FROM ENO:  This is part 2 of a 5-part series about how to stay active in the outdoors through flatland training – essentially, training for the mountains without actually being in the mountains.***   Last week, we looked at training on loose beach sand for flatlanders. This week, we’re going to incorporate some water. If you’re going to be trekking in the mountains but aren’t able to train in the mountains, swimming is a great way to prepare. Swimming, like running on loose sand, is another low impact activity. You won’t be damaging your joints from constant impact, but you’ll still be able to build muscle. Not to mention that when you get bored with one stroke, you can learn a different stroke. To me, swimming helps build my mental strength as well. If you’re swimming in a deep pool, it’s easy to let your mind start wandering and thinking that you might drown. Think about it, you start off in the shallow end where it’s maybe 4 feet deep and then all of a sudden, it drops off the 12 feet. It can be a little menacing. If you get too tired and need a break, you have...

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