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Adventurers may find themselves in secluded and extreme places. Whether it’s in the mountains, down winding river roads, or in the basic lake, much can go wrong before you even make it to the trail head. If your excursion involves a long drive, don’t let car and road problems drag you down. Follow these simply tips to make sure your adventure is one you’ll enjoy.   Vehicle First, you must pick an adventure vehicle capable of the trip you plan to make. If the trail head is off a paved road, or even a well packed dirt one, frequently traveled, don’t worry about the lack of four-wheel drive. However, if your trip will take you on rough roads that don’t get much maintenance, make sure the vehicle you take is sturdy enough to handle the potholes and bumps. If you take a vehicle capable of the trip you can cause real damage to your car, become stranded, or even cause an accident.   Maintenance Get your car tuned up. Whether you do this yourself or take it to your local mechanic, make sure your car or truck is mechanically ready for the journey. An oil change, new spark plugs, coolant...
Traveling can bring about unplanned situations at every turn and if we aren’t prepared for them, one could be left in a vulnerable situation or at the very least, highly delayed from the original plan. I have included four items below that I think each car should have in them to be ready for any scenario that may arise. If you have a few extra items to add, always feel free but these are great starting options to keep you safe.   Jumper Cables Find it here. These are very basic, but many cars on the road do not have a set of these in their vehicle. They are one of the most essential items due to the fact the probability is high that at some point your battery will die in your car or the car of one of your friends. It is a very simple process and anyone can use these to fix the problem at hand with minimal training. These won’t cost more than $30 and can be purchased at your local auto store.   First Aid Kit Find it here. Don’t feel obligated to buy an elaborate kit that suits every single scenario that one could...
My small hatchback received a multitude of weary looks when I voiced its responsibility to transport four adults across the country this summer. In addition to having a small car, it’s easy to fall into a trap of spending hundreds of dollars on food that zaps the energy from your system, leaving uncomfortable and grumpy passengers. So how do you travel long distance and feel good doing it? Here are my 4 go-to steps for feelgood, multi-mile travel: 1. Prioritize What You Take: Ask yourself this question for every single item: “Do I really need this?” When traveling in a small car, it’s important to only take the items you will use multiple times, not just once. Embrace the beauty of rewearing clothes. Two shirts, maybe even one. One pair of pants. One jacket. One pair of shoes. You can do it, I believe in you! Once mastering this concept, traveling is incredibly freeing! On my most recent trip from Missouri to the East Coast this fall, my travel partner and I were able to pack light and arguably have more fun because of it. We only filled about 1/4 of the space in her car and still had everything we needed. Score! It’s all about your mindset and how willing you...
Gas stations and fast food are a road trip “go to” for grabbing quick food; however, fried food and soda are not the ideal thing to be eating on long car trips. Burgers slurped down with a Coke do not exactly settle well in your stomach, especially when you are sitting down in a car for long periods of time. But sometimes it seems like there is no other choice.
Car topping is a great and efficient way to get your kayak or outdoor gear to your final destination. With more and more products being introduced in the roof rack and kayak market, it can be confusing picking the right roof rack, let alone figuring out the specifics of how to car top your kayak securely.
The Oregon coast has a lot to offer, and The Devil’s Punchbowl is just one chill amazing stop right off the road.
I’m a big dreamer with a wild sense of adventure.  I normally dream so big that people who don’t know me well think I’m kidding, when, in reality, I’m 100% serious.  That being said, I’ve always wanted to road trip from coast to coast of the US, stopping to see all the national parks along the way and visiting other sights spontaneously.  A good friend and I have talked and dreamed about it for years, but we decided that this is our summer to do it.  We’ve been spending hours on the Internet trying to plan out details for our road trip that hopefully will happen next month. In the process of planning numerous road trips prior to this one (but certainly nowhere near the distance of a cross-country drive), I’ve collected dozens of helpful travel apps and websites.  I have found these certain websites are essential for planning the perfect road trip. My planning/thought process generally starts with giggling over unrealistic destinations on Pinterest, but then starting to move towards more realistic goals and making note of them in a Google Doc.  Google Docs are THE BEST for planning anything in collaboration with other people – in my case, a...
Instead of heading down to Panama City Beach, Florida/South Padre, Texas/Daytona Beach, Florida to unleash the wild side (like most college students do for Spring Break), I decided to hop in my 1995 Toyota Camry (yes, I named her Tammy the Camry) and head West. I packed up my Gregory Baltoro 65 pack, along with my smaller Sunature daypack, my two ENO Hammocks, a sleeping bag, a tent, some dry goods from the grocery store, a cooler of perishables, and took off on this route: La Crosse, WI → Minnesota → Iowa → Nebraska → Denver, CO. We then decided to head South/further West through Colorado’s many State Parks, and finally out into Utah where we went to Arches National Park. That was as far West as we made it! On the way home, we went into Wyoming – where we saw a lot of buffalo/bison, cows, and horses. Ayers Natural Bridge is a must see if you’re ever in Wyoming! Gorgeous. We then drove straight East and headed back to La Crosse. South Dakota’s Black Hills, Mount Rushmore, and the Badlands were pretty darn cool as well. Here are my Top Ten reasons to make your next Spring Break an unforgettable Road Trip like...
Road trips are a great way to see the country. There’s nothing like heading out on the open road not knowing who you might meet or where you might end up. One of the most scenic road trips in the world is The Pacific Coast Highway. But what are the very best stops? Here are some of the places you can’t miss.   The Redwoods The Pacific Coast Highway stretches for hundreds of miles. But Northern California has a host of beautiful places to stop before making it into warmer territory. Just out of Crescent City, you’ll be treated with your first taste of the redwoods in the Del Norte Coast State park. Del Norte has 50 percent old growth redwoods, and eight miles of wild coastline. Wilson Beach or False Klamath Cove are great beaches for exploring tide pools during low tide, however, the rough seas make it a poor place to swim and there are signs that warn against this. For miles afterward you will be treated to the redwood highway. There are lots of places to stop and explore on trails that reach deep into the redwood forest. Along this section of highway 101, you’ll find plenty...

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