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Back To SchoolWhether you are excited or not, it’s that time of year again. A new school year is beginning.  Being prepared for a new semester is very important. You want to make sure you have everything you need so the transition from beach towels and bathing suits to books and calculators goes smoothly. These are my top 5 things that help me make the transition back to books and schedules a little bit less painful. Planner Okay, so as I embark on a new year, the first thing I buy is a planner. Planners help me stayed organized so when teachers bombard me with assignments and things I will need for class; I can make sure I have what I need to keep the transition back to the real world as easy as possible. Planners aren’t just good for the beginning of the year though, they help me stayed focused and organized throughout the entire year. It’s also a great way to look at the semester and find the best weekends for outdoor adventures.   Backpack The ENO Rothbury backpack was designed to make everyday life easier with its padded laptop sleeve, durable build and its many easy access storage compartments....
July 22nd is National Hammock Day and we’re kind of excited!!! Hammock culture is spreading like wildfire and hammockers are amazingly creative, adventurous, and definitely chill!
Throughout history, nature has had a leading role as a source of inspiration for both musicians and visual artists. Dating back to even prehistoric cave drawings in Lascaux, France or even the Grand Canyon Suite composed by Grofe, nature has always been and will always be a driving force of creative inspiration. Things in nature are tangible references that we use all the time. From the moment we have memories as little kids, we have been in nature and have used it to learn. From drawing lollipop-looking flowers underneath a cotton ball clouded sky or making a thunderstorm, clapping our hands various ways in class, nature has been a part of our foundational education simply because it is one of the most palpable things we have. Just walk outside and there it is. Similarly, we use words and common figures of speech that originally have a meaning that is found in nature to describe events or objects in our daily lives. For example, a dry or wet signal, lightning fast reflexes, a rocky start, root of a problem, etc…The list goes on. Why did it become this way? Because nature is where life begins and has always been there for...
We’ve all been there, sitting around with our friends, attempting to plan a spontaneous cross country road trip and then slowly the dream fades as the details become more and more difficult to work through. Well, don’t lose hope! Here is list of places to explore, from East to West (or Vice Versa) that I have personally been to. These highlights will hopefully give you some ideas, ease those painful and annoying details, and encourage you to go on the trip of a lifetime!   1. Huntington Island, SC  One of my favorite places to camp. Ever! I went in with expectations that the beach would be cool, but not life altaringly amazing. All expectations were shattered. Imagine Jurassic Park, but in the best way, sans life threatening dinosaurs.   2. Pisgah, NC Classic Appalachian camping. With one of the prettiest Autumn seasons and fly fishing streams galore, what’s not to love?   3. Red River Gorge, KY This place is not only an awesome camping spot, but has numerous climbing routes and bouldering options within the gorge, providing some awesome activities and entertainment.   4. Meramec St Park, MO Two words, Fisher Cave. The park is cool as is,...
I found out about the Pinnacles National Park back in 2013 when it was officially declared the newest National Park in California (it had previously been a national monument) and I have wanted to visit ever since.
The modern reality is that kids are going farther away for continuing their lives after high school than their parents’ generation did. Whether it is the 45-minute drive to the state university or taking the dream job on the opposite coast, any distance can be enough to change many dynamics. However, just because the frequency or duration of time spent with loved ones isn’t the same doesn’t mean the bond has to deteriorate. Growing up in the suburbs of Cleveland, my dad and I were always close. I started Scouting in the first grade and he was involved every step of the way, even after I left home for college. There is something about camping every month and going to work with each other that creates a unique bond between father and son. The bond that my father and I have is special, but not unique. Nearly everyone can stop right now and think about a family member or best-friend that they wish they had more time to spend with. So here is my advice to making sure that bond stays strong, create tradition. Creating Tradition Moving four hours away put an end to camping every month, but it didn’t take...
For the common budget traveler, buying your food from stands and supermarkets can be a great way to minimize expenses and give yourself the flavors of a region. However, most markets these days carry many similar items to what we can find at home and, as creatures of comfort, we’ll tend to buy what we know. One way to get around this pitfall of human behavior is to get an idea of how the locals use their ingredients. Here in Argentina, it was immediately apparent that meat was the central basis of all important meals. More so, we found that the style of cooking it mattered as much, or more, than the quality of cut you used. So for this first post in How to Grocery Shop in Latin America (a 4-part series), we’ll talk about the Argentine Asado and what you’ll need to have a successful meal with your new culinary insights. Let’s start by defining what this term means: Asado is a term used both for a range of barbecue techniques and the social event of having or attending a barbecue in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay and Uruguay, where it is an exceptionally popular dish. In these countries, asado is a traditional...
Professional tree climber and ENO sponsored athlete: Tim Kovar Tim’s story starts in the 1970s when he and his buddies started a tree climbing club. “I knew back then that I wanted to live in the trees, it’s where I found peace and a deep connection to nature,” Tim writes to LifeView Outdoors. In 1993, Kovar started his career as an arborist but found the peacefulness of trees, that he so enjoyed, was disrupted by the use of chainsaws. He ‘turned over a new leaf’ and started teaching others how to climb trees in a more technical style which is even safer than the old way. After a decade, he founded a tree climbing school called the Tree Climbing Planet . He has worked with scientists, filmmakers, children and elderly. “The oldest child I’ve taken tree climbing is an 85 year old woman, I guess some of us never grow up,” writes Tim. After asking Tim about his most epic tree climb, he tells the tale about the time he climbed into the 5th largest tree in the world, a Giant Sequoia named “Stagg.” Into the tree? “The top was broken off, maybe 800 years ago, creating an arboreal cave. You could actually climb inside the trunk of the tree. This “cave”...
Hammocks are great. They’re comfortable, relaxing, and portable! But what if I were to tell you there’s more to a hammock than just their serene qualities?

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