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To my wonderful mother: Thank you for teaching me to love the outdoors. While most of my friends grew up with Disney Land and Six Flags, I grew up with weekend trips to Rainier with my family, scraping my knees on mountains instead of concrete. I have my mother to thank for that, who dragged my dad, my 2 brothers and I to nearly every national park in the Northwest USA (and Alberta) by the time I was 11. That’s right- In addition to my birth, these great genes, and thousands of dollars, I also have some of my best memories to thank my mother for. Now that I’m close to graduating college, I’m hoping it’ll be my turn to treat her and drag her all over the world. Take your Kids Exploring- even if they initially might not want to. I’m not going to lie- when I was younger I didn’t appreciate campouts nearly as much as I should have. Did I whine about the long car rides? Yes. Not being able to shower for 3 days? Yes. Waking up with the first crack of sunlight? Oh, absolutely. To anyone who’s experienced Mother Nature full force, you won’t be surprised to...
Perhaps you’re a city person who craves the great outdoors, or maybe you were born to live in nature but have chosen a city-bound career. Either way, you’ve resigned yourself to always sacrificing one for the other. Sacrifice no more, because you really can have it all. Here are four U.S. cities that provide the best of both worlds.   Washington, D.C. After picturing the White House, most people think of D.C.’s museums, monuments and the staggering variety of world cuisines. You may not realize, however, that D.C. also boasts more acres of green space per capita than any other comparably sized U.S. city. For hikers and kayakers, the city’s Rock Creek Park has 40 miles of hiking trails and Class III and IV rapids. The C&O towpath is a cyclist’s dream, starting in the city along the Potomac River and ending 185 miles later in Cumberland, Maryland. Cycle less than 20 miles on the C&O (or drive less than five miles from downtown), and you’ll find a challenging and beautiful hike on the Billy Goat Trail, rock climbing in Mather Gorge and kayaking along the Potomac. Venture a little farther out and find yourself in the Blue Ridge Mountains...
Travel: to go, move, or journey from one place to another. Whether you have done so in the past, are currently doing so, or about to do so – traveling is something a vast majority of us desire to do. When I say traveling, what I really mean is getting out of our comfort zone and into a new place, surrounded by new people. This could represent an umpteen amount of situations. Which could be moving away from your hometown – to college, going on a road trip, studying in a foreign country, or just outright moving to a different state/country. The type of people that constantly crave this “travel” are people that I tend to get along with and connect indefinitely with. Which is why this post may be a tiny bit biased! I would classify myself – and others that are interested in traveling as much as possible – as wanderlusters. Our hearts, minds, bodies, and souls crave the unknown. We desire to be surrounded by anything and everything unfamiliar. We have an ache within us to travel. Traveling is not just simply traveling. Even with no clear purpose, traveling this world we live in makes us grow...
As the festivities of Bike Month continue, May 16th marks Bike to Work Day! Not all of us have the option to bicycle to our job–but a lot of us do. Even if you can’t bike to work, this month is all about encouraging others, making an effort to bike more and raising awareness of how we get around. We can strive to leave less trace in our everyday lives, just like we strive to leave no trace in the woods. ________________________________________________________________________________________ Make Yourself Visible Whether you deck out your helmet, add flashing lights, or wear a brightly colored vest while you bike–make yourself hard to miss! The first step of a car respectfully sharing the road, is for them to see you.   Be Predictable Bicycling to work is not the time to show off your moves. Use your hand signals. Obey traffic laws if you’re on a real road. If a car can tell what your next move is and vice a versa, everyone will be safer.   Leave Early and Stay Cool You don’t want to end up being the “stinky one” in the workplace. If you leave early, it will be cooler and you can bike at a slower pace...
Shake, shake it–your hammock that is! Out of the countless places you can string up a hammock, it’s hard to beat two good trees. And as Leave No Trace endorses, hammocks are great in the way that they have a minimal impact on the life of the forest floor.
It’s no secret that ENOpian’s LOVE animals. I’m sure my pup is not the only one out their who joins me in my hammock. When one has a fierce love for the outdoors, often that translates to an appreciation for animals, namely everyone’s best friend–the dog. A lot of backpackers and outdoor enthusiasts have furry companions that join them on their outdoor adventures. However we know all too well that anything can happen on backcountry expeditions. Accidents happen because they are not foreseeable, but you can be prepared. Read on to learn about the main doggy-first-aid essentials so next time you and your best friend hit the trail, you’ll have the confidence to come to their rescue.   Tick Key If you happen to find one of these creepy crawly bloodsuckers sneaking up your leg, you’ll be glad you packed this for your pooch. These keys aid in actually removing the head of the tick–which if it’s left in can cause infection. It’s cheap and lightweight so there’s no excuse not to pick one of these up–especially if you’re hiking around in the southeast in the summer.   Saline Another item that be used on animals and humans alike. Saline...
Eno Student LoungeRecently we got our nerd on and dove into hammockers cognitive performances with Lyon College. Building on last year’s pilot hammock study where members of Lyon’s Psychology Department surveyed 80 Lyon students to determine their hammocks and relaxation attitude. the second part of the series examined how hammocks fared when compared with a traditional desk chair and an Adirondack chair. “From what we’ve seen and heard through our fans, hammocks are a great alternative to take a time-out between classes, or rest and recuperate after a hard day’s work. We wanted this next section of the study to prove that.” -Adam Cohen, ENO’s Head of Vendor Relation The second part involved randomly assigning approximately 75 participants to one of three conditions: a desk chair, Adirondack chair or ENO hammock. The participants rated their levels of specific emotions, state of relaxation and physical symptoms before sitting in their respective seat and performing a number of cognitive tasks. Following the completion of the tasks, participants again rated their emotions, relaxation and physical symptoms. The results, although not demonstrating a difference in cognitive tasks, did show that there were significant differences between the amount of change in some emotions, relaxation and physical symptoms...
We all know that ENOpians love the outdoors. Most of you can’t wait to go play in the backcountry in your off time. When we delve into the depths of the forest however, there are many skills that we must possess in order to respect the land and protect ourselves. Including wildlife safety.
It’s a well known fact that avid hammockers like ENOpians, care about the environment and therefore like to get their hands dirty in it. Gardening can be some of the most rewarding and educational past times in the warm months. And I’m happy to say that these times are upon us!

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